News Wrap: Hong Kong officials move to deny new protests

News Wrap: Hong Kong officials move to deny new protests


JUDY WOODRUFF: In the day’s other news: Another
U.S. service member has been killed in combat
in Afghanistan.
NATO reported the death today, but gave no
details.
It came amid reports that the U.S. and the
Taliban may be nearing a peace agreement.
Some 14,000 U.S. troops remain in Afghanistan,
providing air cover and support for Afghan
forces.
Authorities in Hong Kong moved today to head
off new pro-democracy protests.
They denied permission for a major march scheduled
for tomorrow.
It would have marked five years since mainland
China barred democratic elections for Hong
Kong’s chief executive.
Meanwhile, two veteran activists were arrested,
and then released on bail.
They vowed to fight for the self-determination
of Hong Kong.
JOSHUA WONG, Pro-Democracy Activist: We shall
not surrender.
And I urge international communities to send
a clear message to President Xi.
Sending troops or using emergency ordinance
is not the way out.
We will continue our fight, no matter how
they arrest and prosecute us.
JUDY WOODRUFF: Hong Kong’s police chief warned
of jail time for anyone who is caught at non-sanctioned
rallies this weekend.
Iran is still building up a stockpile of enriched
uranium, violating the 2015 nuclear agreement.
That word comes from the United Nations’ nuclear
watchdog agency.
It also says that Iran continues to enrich
uranium at a higher level than allowed.
Tehran announced earlier this summer that
it would begin violating parts of the nuclear
agreement after the U.S. quit the deal last
year.
In Australia, officials today lowered the
outlook for the health of the Great Barrier
Reef to very poor.
Environment Minister Sussan Ley said warming
oceans and other factors are killing the corals
that make up the reef.
SUSSAN LEY, Australian Environment Minister:
This reef has suffered in the last few years
six cyclones, two major coral-bleaching events,
and various attacks by the predator crown-of-thorns
starfish.
So, unsurprisingly, the outlook is that the
condition has deteriorated.
And the report calls out the biggest threat
to the reef, which is climate change.
JUDY WOODRUFF: The Great Barrier Reef is the
world’s largest coral reef system.
Back in this country, the Democratic Party
effectively canceled plans for virtual caucuses
in Iowa and Nevada, letting people vote by
phone in 2020.
But national party leaders said the system
could be vulnerable to hacking.
And on the Republican side, Illinois Congressman
John Shimkus announced that he will retire.
He is the 14th House Republican not running
again next year, compared with nearly 40 in
the 2018 midterms.
The official account of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey
was hacked today, sending out vulgar and racist
tweets.
Twitter quickly deleted the posts and said
it’s investigating.
The incident may be related to Twitter’s promise
to crack down on hate speech.
Ford is recalling more than 550,000 trucks
and SUVs over potentially faulty seat backs.
They could fail to hold passengers in place
in a crash.
The recall includes F-150 pickups, Super Duty
trucks, Explorers and Expeditions from model
years 2018 to 2020.
Wall Street had a quiet day headed into the
long Labor Day weekend.
The Dow Jones industrial average gained 41
points to close at 26403.
The Nasdaq fell 10 points, and the S&P 500
added about two points.
And a passing to note.
Former Dallas Police Detective Jim Leavelle
has died.
He became part of history two days after President
Kennedy’s assassination in November 1963.
Leavelle was at the police station in the
light-colored suit, escorting the man who
killed Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald, at the
moment that Oswald was fatally shot by nightclub
owner Jack Ruby.
In later years, Leavelle spoke about his experience
and he rejected all conspiracy theories about
the assassination.
Jim Leavelle was 99 years old.
Still to come on the “NewsHour”: why guerrilla
fighters in Colombia are vowing once again
to take up arms; members of Congress come
face to face with the concerns of their constituents;
Mark Shields and David Brooks break down the
latest moves from the 2020 campaign trail;
impermanence on display, an artist captures
the spirit of change; and much more.

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