Jim Gaffigan on ‘Troop Zero,’ Comedy, and Being a Dad of 5 | NowThis

Jim Gaffigan on ‘Troop Zero,’ Comedy, and Being a Dad of 5 | NowThis


– This is what I look
like, it’s mostly my fault. – Jim Gaffigan, I have a question. Do you feel pressure at all to go into a room and
be funny all the time? Or is that something that doesn’t really cross your mind?
– You know, it’s weird, I think that
there is some value in it. I think being known as a comedian, you’re given leeway on irreverence or inappropriate behavior. Like, even walking down the hallway here, there was a meeting and I
just looked in and I was like, And you know, not everyone knew who I was, but the people that did were like, “He’s a comedian, he’s being funny.” Since I’m known as a comedian, the behavior is considered funny. (both chuckling) – So what makes you laugh? When do you giggle the most? Like, uncontrollable giggle? I’m talking tears rolling
down your face laugh. – Oh gosh, I mean, you know, there’s, I mean there’s some
moments, that you know, there’s moments in
“Succession,” that TV show, that really made me laugh. My children make me
laugh, unintentionally. I mean it helps that they look like me, I suppose.
(interviewer chuckling) But, you know, even my 14-year-old son, who’s wildly disrespectful, is so funny at times and so quick. But each of my children is very funny. But I think that’s unique. I mean you would think they’re funny, too, but it’s almost kinda special
’cause I have an attachment to them.
– It’s like a mini you. – Yeah.
– Looking back at you, making you laugh. – So what has been the one life lesson that you really want
your kids to remember? If they only retain one
thing you’ve taught them, what would it be? – Ooh, that’s a good question. I would say It’s not an immediate reward, but I try and instill a work ethic because I think there’s
something rewarding in work. – [Woman] What’s the hold up? – [Jim] Having a little man talk. – Sports, drinking, strippers. You’re blackmailing me? – When did you first
realize that hard work could not only give you
a career in performing, but you could also make money from it? – Well you know, I love
acting and stand-up comedy. I think being a stand-up
as well as an actor, what’s weird about stand-up
is you have this level of control. Like, you can come up
with an idea, go on stage, and try it almost immediately. Whereas acting, you have to
wait for the right scenario. Or even if you produce your own stuff, you have to wait for the
pieces to come together. But I think in stand-up,
I learned right away that it’s all constructed
on self-assignment. And there’s no real kind of, you know, there are norms of how often
someone should do a special or change their material. – So we’re here to talk about “Troop Zero” and I’ve gotta tell you, it made me feel really good last night. – Like, I needed it.
– Oh good. – I was cruising through Twitter, going, “Oh (beep), World War
III’s about to start, my country’s on fire.” And it made me feel, just felt heartfelt and
funny and I laughed. – Life comes at you
hard, you set it on fire. – Don’t do nothing half-ass. – I don’t wanna do
anything with half an ass. (explosion booming) – Oh! – So why did you want to get
involved in this project? – I mean, if a movie with
Viola Davis and Allison Janney. – Birdies have a strict quality code. – My boos are quality.
(child farting) – The script was really ambitious, it’s kind of this group of oddballs. As you pointed out, there’s
a nice message there, you know what I mean? – Oh, that’s nice.
– You know, ’cause it kind of embraces the oddity. You know, I can tell my kids that, look, the people that are
weird are doing something right and that’s kind of what I think one of the messages of this movie is. Would’ve been good for you
to be around other girls. Lord knows I raised you like
one of them hillbillies. – Whoop! (bottle clonking) – When do you feel
comfortable in embracing what makes you weird? – (laughing) Before you came
in here with your warmup? – No, I think that I, it took me a while. Like, I think I didn’t realize that – And I mean, it really
was an all-star cast, you said Allison Janney, Viola Davis.
– Yeah, Mike Epps. – It was incredible and you all did this
superstar performance. But what was more intimidating, sharing a screen with Viola Davis or this super talented bunch of kids? – You know, I am the parent of five kids. Then usually when I work on movies, it’s a little bit of a vacation, but there were more kids on this movie. I would say, Viola Davis. I’d worked with Allison Janney, but I was very intimidated
about working with Viola. I mean, she’s very nice
and everything, but she is And so is Allison, but I
had worked with her before. – When you are going into a scene and you’re feeling a little bit nervous, like you just described, how do you get over that? – I think it’s so important
that things don’t get in the way of what the scene or the
character’s supposed to do. So luckily I’ve been doing it long enough where that’s not so much of an issue, like being prepared for the scene. I’m always, as a comedian, when I’m working on any
type of movie or something, so that if I have to do an
adjustment, it’s not a big deal. – And you do have this legion
of very loyal fans of people that think they know you really well, but what is the one thing that you wish more people knew about you? – I mean, I feel as though – Think I can be part alien? – I sure as heck hope not. I think that I’m far more open
than I thought I would be, but there is something of, like, people would see me on the
street and they’re, like, And I’m, like, “What do
you mean get over here?” And they’re, like, “Get over here.” – They feel like they’re
entitled to you, right? – Yeah.
– Because you’re a public personality. – And some of it is, I think because I am kind of an every man. Like, they wouldn’t do that to Brad Pitt. They wouldn’t be, like, But I’m kind of a guy, they’re, like, Like you know, I’m somebody
I went to school with, you know what I mean? And I’m kind of goofy looking, so I can be seen from far away. And I’m blind so I can’t see that far, so it’s a strange kind of awkwardness. – So how often do you go over when you’re summoned on the street? – If I’m by myself, I might be fascinated, but if I’m with my
family, I’d be like, “No.” (interviewer chuckling) And some people are, like, “But you’ve gotta come over here.” I’m like, “No I don’t.” – (laughing) And what’s next for you? What can we expect to see? – Breaking news. – And I’m on the platform of And, um– – That (beep) nasty, I agree with it. It’s spiky.
– And, like, the kale Caesar, can
we stop with the kale Caesar? What happened to the,
just, Caesar, you know? Anyway, these are important issues that are all part of my platform.

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